Emerald Nuts' Latest Marketing Campaign: 'Yes Good,' Not Great – Forbes

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In late March of this year, the snack brand Emerald Nuts unveiled a new marketing campaign with a terse, two-word tagline: "Yes Good." According to Barton F. Graf, the agency behind the ads, the succinct motto was lifted verbatim from an anonymous Amazon review of Emerald Nuts posted on June 6, 2016.

The agency ran with the concept, building a "Yes Good" website, offering "Yes Good" baseball caps and coffee mugs on Emerald’s social media channels, and even creating a series of short videos based on other real customer reviews. They also put up outdoor advertising in Boston, Miami, and New York that simply feature the "Yes Good" slogan in bold white font beneath the Emerald brand logo.

Critics praised the campaign. In July, for example, Adweek included it on a list entitled "The 25 Best Ads of 2017 (So Far)." Digiday called it a good tagline.

According to data from YouGov BrandIndex, the "Yes Good" campaign, launched near the end of March 2017, seems to have helped Emerald Nuts reach the highest Word of Mouth Exposure score it’s received in the past few years. A look at numbers since the beginning of 2017 shows that the snack brand went from under 1% of all US adults talking about it in January to slightly more than 4% in April. Since then, the score has largely remained within the 2–3% range.

YouGov

That is indeed "yes good," but the slight boost still leaves Emerald Nuts far behind other snack giants, such as Lay’s and Doritos, which currently have Word of Mouth Exposure scores of 16% and 20%, respectively.

At the same time, the "Yes Good" motto also seems to correlate with a temporary spike in Purchase Consideration for Emerald Nuts – meaning more consumers reported a willingness to consider purchasing the brand when next in the market to buy snacks after the campaign launched, as opposed to before it.

Furthermore, consumers who, in the past 90 days, said they’d consider purchasing Emerald Nuts when hunting for snacks offer promising signs for the brand’s marketing campaign. First, they’re ten points more likely than the general public to agree that posters and billboards help inform them of new products and services; the "Yes Good" campaign included outdoor advertising in a few major American cities. Second, this group of particular consumers is also ten points more likely than the public at large to say they expect advertising to be entertaining. If there’s one thing "Yes Good" and its accompanying videos strive for, it’s that.

YouGov

Last month, Emerald Nuts’ parent company, Snyder’s-Lance, released its financial results for the second quarter of 2017. The report states that the company’s core brands, which include Emerald, along with Kettle Brand, Pop Secret, and Snyder’s of Hanover pretzels, generated a net revenue of $420.5 million, compared to $401.7 million during the same time period last year – an increase of 4.7%.

This post was written by Ted Marzilli, CEO of BrandIndex.

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Getty

In late March of this year, the snack brand Emerald Nuts unveiled a new marketing campaign with a terse, two-word tagline: “Yes Good.” According to Barton F. Graf, the agency behind the ads, the succinct motto was lifted verbatim from an anonymous Amazon review of Emerald Nuts posted on June 6, 2016.

The agency ran with the concept, building a “Yes Good” website, offering “Yes Good” baseball caps and coffee mugs on Emerald’s social media channels, and even creating a series of short videos based on other real customer reviews. They also put up outdoor advertising in Boston, Miami, and New York that simply feature the “Yes Good” slogan in bold white font beneath the Emerald brand logo.

Critics praised the campaign. In July, for example, Adweek included it on a list entitled “The 25 Best Ads of 2017 (So Far).” Digiday called it a good tagline.

According to data from YouGov BrandIndex, the “Yes Good” campaign, launched near the end of March 2017, seems to have helped Emerald Nuts reach the highest Word of Mouth Exposure score it’s received in the past few years. A look at numbers since the beginning of 2017 shows that the snack brand went from under 1% of all US adults talking about it in January to slightly more than 4% in April. Since then, the score has largely remained within the 2–3% range.

YouGov

That is indeed “yes good,” but the slight boost still leaves Emerald Nuts far behind other snack giants, such as Lay’s and Doritos, which currently have Word of Mouth Exposure scores of 16% and 20%, respectively.

At the same time, the “Yes Good” motto also seems to correlate with a temporary spike in Purchase Consideration for Emerald Nuts – meaning more consumers reported a willingness to consider purchasing the brand when next in the market to buy snacks after the campaign launched, as opposed to before it.

Furthermore, consumers who, in the past 90 days, said they’d consider purchasing Emerald Nuts when hunting for snacks offer promising signs for the brand’s marketing campaign. First, they’re ten points more likely than the general public to agree that posters and billboards help inform them of new products and services; the “Yes Good” campaign included outdoor advertising in a few major American cities. Second, this group of particular consumers is also ten points more likely than the public at large to say they expect advertising to be entertaining. If there’s one thing “Yes Good” and its accompanying videos strive for, it’s that.

YouGov

Last month, Emerald Nuts’ parent company, Snyder’s-Lance, released its financial results for the second quarter of 2017. The report states that the company’s core brands, which include Emerald, along with Kettle Brand, Pop Secret, and Snyder’s of Hanover pretzels, generated a net revenue of $420.5 million, compared to $401.7 million during the same time period last year – an increase of 4.7%.

This post was written by Ted Marzilli, CEO of BrandIndex.

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